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Problems with technology: weapons Sunday, 6 September 2009

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Today I caught a TV programme that may be useful to some of you.

Channel 71, Discovery Science: The Reinventors, Season 2, Episode 1.

Deals with the machine gun, so get your research cap on and check it if you think it may be useful to your particular topic!

UN Celebrations Project Friday, 4 September 2009

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For year 4 students, here are the resources for our first MYP full Design Cycle project.

Protected: Sample MYP projects Monday, 24 August 2009

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MYP Technology Glossary Tuesday, 18 August 2009

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Please download this extract from the official MYP Technology Guide. It contains a glossary that includes all the essential concepts each and every MYP Technology student needs to know in order to succeed.

Download the PDF document myptech_glossary.pdf.

August 2009 – Welcome back to school MYP lovers! Saturday, 15 August 2009

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For those of you in the grade 9 and 10 classes, it is strongly recommended that you hit the yellow button at the bottom of each page until you get back to the beginning of the blog and then read as much as you can as this will give you a clear explanation of what you need to know to producea good MYP project.

So far, there are eight  pages in the blog – it is recommended that you have a good look around and focus on learning what the MYP criteria are, how to get to the highest levels of assessment and what the common mistakes in each section tend to be.

With a little bit of digging around, this information will be easily accessible to you in a short while.  Good luck and have fun!!!


If you have any questions, please email your teacher and he should be able to answer your questions in a hurry!

MLA formatting of sources Tuesday, 27 January 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, media 10, miscellaneous, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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If you’re new to the MLA format to refer to sources of information, try the free online services

They’ll help you ensure that your bibliography/works cited list is in the correct format. Just fill in the information you know about the source, they help you with the rest.

For more detailed information check these resources from

I have also found a very interesting blog about information literacy called BiblioTech Web.

How to present survey results Tuesday, 27 January 2009

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This is a question we often hear as we go through our Investigation stage of the MYP Design Cycle.

When you survey a group of people, remember to make a reasonable number of questions that are pertinent to your topic. Design your questions so the answers are specific and easy to quantify;  that’s why you always hear us recommending multiple choice, yes/no, and Likert scale types of items for surveys.

If you need to ask open questions, then do interviews better.

Going back to our post title, please head to this web page that shows the results of a survey in a really neat way:

http://www.vault.com/surveys/manners/index.jsp

MYP Orientation Project Friday, 23 January 2009

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Here you will find the topic sheet and annotated assessment criteria for our MYP Computer Technology  Orientation project (helping new students to OFS and/or families new to Singapore) :

Current MYP Project Deadlines Thursday, 22 January 2009

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For our current MYP Comp Apps (both 9 and 10), our first deadline is

  • Our second class after Lunar New Year.

You need to bring a printed (hard copy) of your

  1. Investigation
  2. Design

Please do NOT miss any deadline. Failure to meet any deadline will result in you getting an interim report.

MYP Project: Orientation Friday, 16 January 2009

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Write down a first journal (draft or notes for your project) containing:

  • A mindmap of idea(s) for your current MYP Technology project, “Helping new students”. You may use resources from:

http://www.mymindmap.net/Mind_Map_Templates.html

or

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mind_mapping_software

  • Design and distribute an email survey to your whole class on issues related to the project topic. You may want to use Survey Monkey.

MYP Assessment Criteria Monday, 12 January 2009

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MYP Technology: Assessment Criteria

The following assessment criteria have been established by the IBO for Technology in the MYP.

Criterion A Investigate Maximum 6
Criterion B Design Maximum 6
Criterion C Plan Maximum 6
Criterion D Create Maximum 6
Criterion E Evaluate Maximum 6
Criterion F Attitudes in technology Maximum 6
Grade Boundaries
1 0-5
2 6-9
3 10-15
4 16-21
5 22-26
6 27-31
7 32-36

For each assessment criterion, a number of band descriptors are defined.

These describe a range of achievement levels with the lowest represented as 0.

The criteria are equally weighted.

The descriptors concentrate on positive achievement, although failure to achieve may be included in the description for the lower levels.

Detailed descriptions of the assessment criteria and band descriptors follow.

Criterion A: Investigate
Maximum 6

Investigation
is an essential stage in the design cycle. Students are expected to identify the problem, develop a design brief and formulate a design specification. Students are expected to acknowledge the sources of information and document these appropriately.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student states the problem. The student investigates the problem, collecting information from sources. The student lists some specifications.

3–4

The student describes the problem, mentioning its relevance. The student investigates the problem, selecting and analysing information from some acknowledged sources. The student describes a test to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

5–6

The student explains the problem, discussing its relevance. The student critically investigates the problem, evaluating information from a broad range of appropriate, acknowledged sources. The student describes detailed methods for appropriate testing to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

Design brief: The student’s response to the challenge, showing how they intend to solve the problem they have been presented with. This will guide their investigation as they work to develop a more detailed design specification.

Design specification: A
detailed description of the conditions, requirements and restrictions with which a design must comply. This is a precise and accurate list of facts such as conditions, dimensions, materials, process and methods that are important for the designer and for the user. All appropriate solutions will need to comply with the design specification.

Criterion B: Design
Maximum 6

Students are expected to generate several feasible designs that meet the design specification and to evaluate these against the design specification.

Students are then expected to select one design, justify their choice and evaluate this in detail against the design specification.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student generates one design, and makes some attempt to justify this against the design specification.

3–4

The student generates a few designs, justifying the choice of one design and fully evaluating this against the design specification.

5–6

The student generates a range of feasible designs, each evaluated against the design specification. The student justifies the chosen design and evaluates it fully and critically against the design specification.

Criterion C: Plan
Maximum 6

Students are expected to construct a plan to create their chosen product/solution that has a series of logical steps, and that makes effective use of resources and time.

Students are expected to evaluate the plan and justify any modifications to the design.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student produces a plan that contains some details of the steps and/or the resources required.

3–4

The student produces a plan that contains a number of logical steps that include resources and time. The student makes some attempt to evaluate the plan.

5–6

The student produces a plan that
contains a number of detailed, logical steps that describe the use of resources and time. The student critically evaluates the plan and justifies any modifications
to the design.

Criterion D: Create
Maximum 6

Students are expected to document, with a series of photographs or a video and a
dated record, the process of making their product/solution, including when and how they use tools, materials and techniques. Students are expected to follow their plan, to evaluate the plan and to justify any changes they make to the plan while they are creating the product/solution.

Students will sometimes embark upon a very ambitious project, or they may encounter unforeseen circumstances. In some circumstances a product/solution that is incomplete or does not function fully can still achieve one of the levels awarded for this criterion.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student considers the plan and creates at least part of a product/solution.

3–4

The student uses appropriate techniques and equipment. The student follows the plan and mentions any modifications made, resulting in a product/solution of good quality.

5–6

The student competently uses appropriate techniques and equipment. The student follows the plan and justifies any modifications made, resulting in a product/solution of appropriate quality using the resources available.

Appropriate quality: This is the best product/solution that the student can produce, taking into account the resources available, the skills and techniques they have used, their educational development, how the product/solution addresses the identified need, and aspects of safety and ergonomics.

Criterion E: Evaluate
Maximum 6

Students are expected to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification in an objective manner based on testing, and to evaluate its impact on life, society and/or the environment. They are expected to explain how the product/solution could be improved as a result of these evaluations.

Students are expected to evaluate their own performance at each stage of the design cycle and to suggest ways in which their performance could be improved.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student evaluates the product/solution or his or her own performance. The student makes some attempt to test the product/solution.

3–4

The student evaluates the product/solution and
his or her own performance and suggests ways in which these could be improved. The student tests the product/solution to evaluate it against the design specification.

5–6

The student evaluates the success of the product/solution in an objective manner based on the results of testing, and the views of the intended users. The student provides an evaluation of his or her own performance at each stage of the design cycle and suggests improvements. The student provides an appropriate evaluation of the impact of the product/solution on life, society and/or the environment.

Product testing: A stage in the design process where versions of products (for example, prototypes) are tested against the need, applied to the context and presented to the end-user or target audience.

Criterion F: Attitudes in technology
Maximum 6

This criterion refers to students’ attitudes when working in technology. It focuses on an overall assessment of two aspects:

  • personal engagement (motivation, independence, general positive attitude)
  • attitudes towards safety, cooperation and respect for others.

By their very nature these qualities are difficult to quantify and assess, and assessment should therefore take into account the context in which the unit of work was undertaken.

Achievement level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student occasionally displays a satisfactory standard in one of the aspects listed above.

3–4

The student frequently displays a satisfactory standard in both of the aspects listed above.

5–6

The student consistently displays a satisfactory standard in both of the aspects listed above.

Evaluation: Common mistakes Sunday, 30 November 2008

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This is a brief compilation of the common omissions in the Evaluation section of the MYP Computer Technology projects:

  • Some students forget to implement the ways of testing the product compliance to the Design Specification. Remember the last part of your Investigation? The tests you designed there (the ones to check that your final product contains all your Design Specs.) should be done when you finish your product, and the results should be published in the Evaluation.
  • Don’t forget to suggest improvement to these ways of testing. More testers? More questions? Better questions? More ways?
  • Most students evaluate their performance at each stage of the project (Investigation, Design, Plan, Creation), but forget to suggest improvements at each stage. Do this for a better level of achievement.
  • Many students forget to comment on the impact of your product/project in the local and global community. This, in a few words, means: how do you think your product could change things in your immediate community (people close to you) and globally (the world)?

Hope this helps you!

Check the rest of the “common mistakes” entries under this tag: mistakes

Creation: Common mistakes Sunday, 30 November 2008

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In  nutshell, these are the common mistakes students do in the Creation stage of their MYP Computer Technology projects:

  • The journal entries are not dated. Each journal entry should start with the date, as this will make things easier for you when you evaluate the plan and your personal performance.
  • The screenshots are small, generic, and show you doing some work on the computer. Your screenshots should clearly show how you created your product. Therefore, the screenshots should show your work with the specific application(s) that you used to put your product toghether.
  • The screenshots show how you do the same things over and over. You do not need to show the same simple procedures more than once. Say, you show in three screenshots how to insert an image into a web page. You may later say that you used the same steps shown in journal entry xx/xx/xx to insert the other images as well.
  • Some students forget that the journal shows the implementation of the plan. Check back with your plan and compare your progress. Any differences between what you planned to do, and when, should be shown somewhere. Justify them and (if appropriate) say what you will do to keep your deadlines (interim and final).
  • Did you make any modifications as you were creating the product? Document any modifications to your (design) product. Justify them clearly.

I hope this helps you improve the quality of your work.

Check the rest of the “common mistakes” entries under this tag: mistakes

Tech Helper MYP Project Thursday, 20 November 2008

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If you want feed back on your Creation and Evaluation, you may submit these sections of your project by Wednesday 26 November.

The final dedaline for the whole project (design folder, AKA write-up or report, plus a CD with the product, softcopies of the journal and design folder) is the first lesson after exam week.

Dangers of Technology MYP Project Thursday, 20 November 2008

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If you want feed back on your Creation and Evaluation, you may submit these sections of your project Thursday 27.Nov.08.

Our first class after exam week is the deadline for our “Dangers of tech.” MYP Project.

How to do good research (and have fun too!) Saturday, 15 November 2008

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After the first few sections of the project were submitted, it became painfully clear that a large number of students are unsure about how to approach the research aspect of their project.

It seems that many people think “research” means logging on to Google and typing in a couple of words and then hoping for the best. This reminds me of a joke that was popular when I was growing up:

Two men rent a boat and go fishing at a lake and have a fantastic day – they each catch several large trout and agree they must return the following day to extend their luck.
One man, lets call him Jacques, says “Hey Henri, did you mark the spot where we caught all those fish?”
Henri nods his head and says “Oh yes Jacques, I put an X on the side of the boat!”
Jacques is angered by this and says “You idiot…how do you know we’ll get the same boat?”

Using very general search terms on Google is the academic equivalent of this silly behaviour, and will likely result in the same level of success.
To do GOOD research, you need a strategy. Here‘s a good place to learn more: http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/vl/www/wwwcon.htm

Check the rest of the “common mistakes” entries under this tag: mistakes

Common mistakes in Design and Planning sections Saturday, 15 November 2008

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After collecting and commenting on the student work recently, there were a variety of problems that cropped up fairly regularly.

Design issues

A large proportion of the projects were missing important elements critical to achieving the higher levels of the criteria. Specifically, it is recommended that all of you check on the following:

  • Improve the quality of the sketches and screen snapshots for EACH of the possible modes – include details about functions, colours, fonts, layout, etc. (Your basic requirement is to offer the impression that you have seriously considered using all of the possible modes and chosen one mode for a logical reason). When you make sketches, use a ruler and make them look as good as possible rather than messy and incomprehensible.
  • Improve the way you display each modes relationship to the design specs – a good way to do this is to build a simple table that has specs on one axis and the modes on the other. Then, simply check off the negatives and positives of each possible approach. (Please note,however, that just because one mode satisfies all the requirements of the design specs doesn’t necessarily make it the best choice. In some cases, there may be factors that render the mode unusable. Eg. Too expensive, etc)
  • Improve the detail of your justification of one mode over the others. Offer clear examples that show you have put some strong thought into this process.


Planning section

Many projects had weak planning sections. Specific issues were as follows:

  • The resource lists were lacking detail or missing completely! A good resource list should clearly display all materials used in the project and also explain why / how they will be used. Eg. It is not suitable to say “I will use a computer” as not all computers (hardware/software) have the same capabilities. It would be better to offer a bit more information, such as the clock speed, size of hard drive, multimedia capabilities (i.e. dvd player / burner, etc) that suggests you have assessed the hardware requirements to make a good product.
  • The Gantt charts were missing key elements; try to add a minimum of at least three sub-categories for each criteria listed, and underneath the Gantt chart, offer a brief but focused analysis of why you have allowed a specific amount of time to complete each criteria required.
  • Try to evaluate your plan carefully and add a section that explains your modifications (changes that occur after you realize that your plan might need to be improved) and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of your plan (called Evaluating the plan in MYP speak)

Hope this helps a bit!

Check the rest of the “common mistakes” entries under this tag: mistakes

Design Stage Monday, 10 November 2008

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Design Section of the MYP Computer Technology Subject

Mode / ‘Media’

  1. Brainstorm mode (media, i.e. web site, movie, etc. – note that you do not mention any specific software application yet)
  2. Compare each possible mode against your Design Specs.
  3. Choose the best mode > the one that meets all your Design Specs. and allows you to finish on time

Designs / ‘Layouts’

  1. For the chosen mode, generate 3 or 4 designs (for movie, you need a storyboard instead of the following elements)
    1. layout
    2. colours
    3. fonts
    4. sizes
    5. etc.
    6. how each specification will be included in each design
  2. Compare each design against the design specifications
  3. Choose one design that meets all the Design Specs. and allows you to finish on time

Dangers of Technology MYP Project Friday, 31 October 2008

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These are the links for the documents relevant to our Dangers of Technology project:

Project planner/Topic sheet

Annotated Assessment Rubric

Tech Helper MYP Project Friday, 31 October 2008

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In case you have difficulty finding these documents in My Public Documents, you may download them directly from here:

These documents are in PDF format. Get Adobe Acrobat Reader if you haven’t got it yet.