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Free Web Creation Software Monday, 28 September 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, miscellaneous, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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Please head to this webpage for a list of links and information on Free Web Creation Software.

http://webdesign.about.com/od/htmleditors/tp/freewineditors.htm

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DVD and CD Burning Software Monday, 28 September 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2, tech support.
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If you need free software to burn your CDs/DVDs with your products and soft copies of your work, you may use

Protected: Sample MYP projects Monday, 24 August 2009

Posted by magicpockets in myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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MYP Technology Glossary Tuesday, 18 August 2009

Posted by D in myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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Please download this extract from the official MYP Technology Guide. It contains a glossary that includes all the essential concepts each and every MYP Technology student needs to know in order to succeed.

Download the PDF document myptech_glossary.pdf.

JavaScript programming links Wednesday, 10 June 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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Reference links for JavaScript programming:

HTML and CSS programming links Wednesday, 10 June 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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HTML/CSS useful links:

QBASIC programming links Wednesday, 10 June 2009

Posted by D in myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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A few useful links about QBASIC that you may find useful:

Pascal programming links Wednesday, 10 June 2009

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These are the best links about Pascal programming I could find. Hope they’ll be useful to you.

Tutorials and additional documentation:

Adobe CS4 help Friday, 15 May 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, miscellaneous, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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Please check the following links for help with their respective applications:

http://www.adobe.com/support/documentation/

You just have to select the application you want to know more about, and start exploring.

Remember that you may also explore Adobe TV – they have video tutorials on all Adobe applications.

http://tv.adobe.com/
(e.g. http://tv.adobe.com/#pg+1584 for Photoshop CS4, http://tv.adobe.com/#pg+1586 for Illustrator CS4, etc.)

MYP Computer Studies G1 Revision Links Thursday, 14 May 2009

Posted by D in assessment, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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Here you will find some links to help you with your revision (most are already known to you, but a few are newer):

Programming (BASIC):

Databases & Logic Gates:

(http://www.tutorialsforopenoffice.org/tutorial/)

(http://documentation.openoffice.org/)

Please note that some OpenOffice.org tutorials may refer to version 2 instead of the current version 3 of the software suite.

Word 2007 Tutorials Wednesday, 4 March 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, miscellaneous, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2, pd.
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Do you know how to automate the creation and updating of a table of contents, reference and citation tools, change tracking, and so on?

Read the following tutorial teaching everything you need to know (and then some more) about Microsoft Word 2007.

http://www.fgcu.edu/support/office2007/Word/index.asp

Windows Movie Maker Wednesday, 11 February 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, miscellaneous, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2, pd.
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Please visit the following web pages if you need tutorials on Windows Movie Maker:

or

Free Video Editor Wednesday, 11 February 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, miscellaneous, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2, pd.
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If you need video editing software alternatives to replace Windows Movie Maker, try

or

History of the Internet Video Wednesday, 28 January 2009

Posted by D in miscellaneous, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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Watch this video — it’s really useful. If you are a Computer Studies student, it is strongly recommended.

Standard Definition Video


High Definition Video


Original source: http://www.lonja.de/motion/mo_history_internet.html

MLA formatting of sources Tuesday, 27 January 2009

Posted by D in comp apps 11/12, media 10, miscellaneous, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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If you’re new to the MLA format to refer to sources of information, try the free online services

They’ll help you ensure that your bibliography/works cited list is in the correct format. Just fill in the information you know about the source, they help you with the rest.

For more detailed information check these resources from

I have also found a very interesting blog about information literacy called BiblioTech Web.

How to present survey results Tuesday, 27 January 2009

Posted by D in myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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This is a question we often hear as we go through our Investigation stage of the MYP Design Cycle.

When you survey a group of people, remember to make a reasonable number of questions that are pertinent to your topic. Design your questions so the answers are specific and easy to quantify;  that’s why you always hear us recommending multiple choice, yes/no, and Likert scale types of items for surveys.

If you need to ask open questions, then do interviews better.

Going back to our post title, please head to this web page that shows the results of a survey in a really neat way:

http://www.vault.com/surveys/manners/index.jsp

Important Information Thursday, 22 January 2009

Posted by D in assessment, comp apps 11/12, myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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Have a look at the following tags linking to posts referring to the following essential information for our classes:

The Command Line Interface Friday, 16 January 2009

Posted by D in myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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I wanted to post some resources regarding our practical activity on CLI.

There are many fun things we can do with the (Mac OS X / Unix / Linux) terminal (sometimes AKA “console”), but the most important commands you need to remember are:

ls
cd
mv
cp

more information on the Bash shell can be found at:

Two-part Beginner’s guide to Apple Terminal ( part one, part two )
This guide is also useful to those who want to learn about Bash, regardless of the platform.

Tutorials about the (Linux) command shell:

Cheat sheet with the most imporntant commands

How to get the (Unix/Linux) terminal under Windows
Be careful with this, not recommended if you are not sure of what you are doing.

Background information on shells

MYP Assessment Criteria Monday, 12 January 2009

Posted by D in myp comp apps 10, myp comp apps 9, myp comp studies g1, myp comp studies g2.
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MYP Technology: Assessment Criteria

The following assessment criteria have been established by the IBO for Technology in the MYP.

Criterion A Investigate Maximum 6
Criterion B Design Maximum 6
Criterion C Plan Maximum 6
Criterion D Create Maximum 6
Criterion E Evaluate Maximum 6
Criterion F Attitudes in technology Maximum 6
Grade Boundaries
1 0-5
2 6-9
3 10-15
4 16-21
5 22-26
6 27-31
7 32-36

For each assessment criterion, a number of band descriptors are defined.

These describe a range of achievement levels with the lowest represented as 0.

The criteria are equally weighted.

The descriptors concentrate on positive achievement, although failure to achieve may be included in the description for the lower levels.

Detailed descriptions of the assessment criteria and band descriptors follow.

Criterion A: Investigate
Maximum 6

Investigation
is an essential stage in the design cycle. Students are expected to identify the problem, develop a design brief and formulate a design specification. Students are expected to acknowledge the sources of information and document these appropriately.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student states the problem. The student investigates the problem, collecting information from sources. The student lists some specifications.

3–4

The student describes the problem, mentioning its relevance. The student investigates the problem, selecting and analysing information from some acknowledged sources. The student describes a test to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

5–6

The student explains the problem, discussing its relevance. The student critically investigates the problem, evaluating information from a broad range of appropriate, acknowledged sources. The student describes detailed methods for appropriate testing to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

Design brief: The student’s response to the challenge, showing how they intend to solve the problem they have been presented with. This will guide their investigation as they work to develop a more detailed design specification.

Design specification: A
detailed description of the conditions, requirements and restrictions with which a design must comply. This is a precise and accurate list of facts such as conditions, dimensions, materials, process and methods that are important for the designer and for the user. All appropriate solutions will need to comply with the design specification.

Criterion B: Design
Maximum 6

Students are expected to generate several feasible designs that meet the design specification and to evaluate these against the design specification.

Students are then expected to select one design, justify their choice and evaluate this in detail against the design specification.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student generates one design, and makes some attempt to justify this against the design specification.

3–4

The student generates a few designs, justifying the choice of one design and fully evaluating this against the design specification.

5–6

The student generates a range of feasible designs, each evaluated against the design specification. The student justifies the chosen design and evaluates it fully and critically against the design specification.

Criterion C: Plan
Maximum 6

Students are expected to construct a plan to create their chosen product/solution that has a series of logical steps, and that makes effective use of resources and time.

Students are expected to evaluate the plan and justify any modifications to the design.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student produces a plan that contains some details of the steps and/or the resources required.

3–4

The student produces a plan that contains a number of logical steps that include resources and time. The student makes some attempt to evaluate the plan.

5–6

The student produces a plan that
contains a number of detailed, logical steps that describe the use of resources and time. The student critically evaluates the plan and justifies any modifications
to the design.

Criterion D: Create
Maximum 6

Students are expected to document, with a series of photographs or a video and a
dated record, the process of making their product/solution, including when and how they use tools, materials and techniques. Students are expected to follow their plan, to evaluate the plan and to justify any changes they make to the plan while they are creating the product/solution.

Students will sometimes embark upon a very ambitious project, or they may encounter unforeseen circumstances. In some circumstances a product/solution that is incomplete or does not function fully can still achieve one of the levels awarded for this criterion.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student considers the plan and creates at least part of a product/solution.

3–4

The student uses appropriate techniques and equipment. The student follows the plan and mentions any modifications made, resulting in a product/solution of good quality.

5–6

The student competently uses appropriate techniques and equipment. The student follows the plan and justifies any modifications made, resulting in a product/solution of appropriate quality using the resources available.

Appropriate quality: This is the best product/solution that the student can produce, taking into account the resources available, the skills and techniques they have used, their educational development, how the product/solution addresses the identified need, and aspects of safety and ergonomics.

Criterion E: Evaluate
Maximum 6

Students are expected to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification in an objective manner based on testing, and to evaluate its impact on life, society and/or the environment. They are expected to explain how the product/solution could be improved as a result of these evaluations.

Students are expected to evaluate their own performance at each stage of the design cycle and to suggest ways in which their performance could be improved.

Achievement level Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student evaluates the product/solution or his or her own performance. The student makes some attempt to test the product/solution.

3–4

The student evaluates the product/solution and
his or her own performance and suggests ways in which these could be improved. The student tests the product/solution to evaluate it against the design specification.

5–6

The student evaluates the success of the product/solution in an objective manner based on the results of testing, and the views of the intended users. The student provides an evaluation of his or her own performance at each stage of the design cycle and suggests improvements. The student provides an appropriate evaluation of the impact of the product/solution on life, society and/or the environment.

Product testing: A stage in the design process where versions of products (for example, prototypes) are tested against the need, applied to the context and presented to the end-user or target audience.

Criterion F: Attitudes in technology
Maximum 6

This criterion refers to students’ attitudes when working in technology. It focuses on an overall assessment of two aspects:

  • personal engagement (motivation, independence, general positive attitude)
  • attitudes towards safety, cooperation and respect for others.

By their very nature these qualities are difficult to quantify and assess, and assessment should therefore take into account the context in which the unit of work was undertaken.

Achievement level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors given below.

1–2

The student occasionally displays a satisfactory standard in one of the aspects listed above.

3–4

The student frequently displays a satisfactory standard in both of the aspects listed above.

5–6

The student consistently displays a satisfactory standard in both of the aspects listed above.